Severe Weather Notification Options

 

Severe Weather Awareness Week – Tip #3

  1. Purchase a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio with S.A.M.E. (specific area message encoding) capabilities. This feature allows you to enter only those counties you want to get weather alerts for. Some local stores carry these radios. You can also order them online. They range in price from $35 – $50 depending on the additional features you want (i.e. AM/FM radio, etc.). You can also research them prior to your purchase by going on to YouTube. These devices work like an AM/FM radio…if you get it home and cannot find a channel were you hear a computerized weather person speaking, then you may need a different radio or an external antenna. Don’t hesitate to call the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242 prior to purchasing one and we will be glad to help you.lapeer radar.jpg
  2. Another great source for early warning notifications are smartphone applications. Here are just a few examples (in no particular order):http://www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/tornado-app
    http://www.abc12.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.wnem.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.minbcnews.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
  3. Tornado sirens. These are an “outdoor” warning device. If you cannot hear your community’s tornado siren on the first Saturday of each month (April – October) at 1:00pm, then please consider purchasing a weather radio.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please don’t hesitate to contact the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242.

Stay safe and stay dry!

Filling Sandbags, Stacking Sandbags & Building A Levee

Flood Wates Effect Areas Throughout ArkansasSevere Weather Awareness Week – Tip #2

Filling Sandbags, Stacking Sandbags & Building A Levee

Should you need to protect your home from flood waters, purchasing sandbags is the most cost effective method, but you can also purchase self-inflating sand bags – they look like a flat pillow and when they come in contact with water, they expand absorbing almost 40lbs of water. You build a levee with them just as you would with sandbags (without all the physical strains). It’s a bit more expensive, but an option for a person that may not be physically fit to fill sandbags.

Sandbag filling Procedures PDF

As you will read on page 3 – item #1, there are a lot of great video resources on YouTube relating to this as well.

[youtuber youtube=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rj7aUwIHYlw’]

If you have any questions, or need additional information on something, please don’t hesitate to contact the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242.

Stay dry!

It’s Here! Spring Has Finally Arrived!

1200669813O0PEfKSevere Weather Awareness Week – Tip #1

Along with the arrival of green grass and beautiful flowers, unfortunately also comes the chance for severe weather.

That is why the State of Michigan has declared April 7th through the 13th Michigan Severe Weather Awareness Week.

Attached are a few items from the American Red Cross that will help you get started on your planning.

Safe and Well Fact Sheet

Power outages

Pet Safety

Flooded & Icy Roads

flooding-lkwd-300x229Many roads in Lapeer County today are flooded and/or icy. Please take extra caution when traveling today. Do not attempt to drive through a flooded roadway.

Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard. The main reason is people underestimate the force and power of water. More than half of all flood related deaths result from vehicles being swept downstream. Of these, many are preventable.

Q: What can I do to avoid getting caught is this situation?

Follow these safety rules:

  • Monitor the NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, or your favorite news source for vital weather related information.
  • If flooding occurs, get to higher ground. Get out of areas subject to flooding. This includes dips, low spots, canyons, washes etc.
  • Avoid areas already flooded, especially if the water is flowing fast. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Road beds may be washed out under flood waters. NEVER drive through flooded roadways. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
  • Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.

Find out more about Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Tornado Spotter Training

2012 Tornado Spotter Training

April 19, 2012, 7 pm
Lapeer East High School
933 S Saginaw St, Lapeer, MI 48446
Pre-Registration open until April 9th.

This training is provided free of charge

Sign up at www.lapeerskywarn.org

Sponsored by:

Lapeer County Office of Emergency Management
Lapeer County Amateur Radio Association
Lapeer County CERT
National Weather Service – White Lake

If you have any questions, please Contact Mary Piorunek at the Emergency Management Office 810-667-0242.

Skywarn Training

Skywarn spotter training sessions are held to train individuals on how to accurately observe such weather
phenomena as floods, hail, wind and its associated da mage, cloud features that lead to tornadoes, and
those cloud features that do not lead to tornadoes.

In addition, topics covered during Skywarn training are:

  • The role of the spotter, the NWS and emergency services;
  • A recap of significant weather events during 2011;
  • The necessary atmospheric conditions for thunderstorm development;
  • Tornadoes;
  • Severe weather safety tips;
  • Severe weather terms used in National Weather Service products;
  • What to report to the National Weather Service; and,
  • How to report information to the National Weather Service.

Skywarn training presentations usually last around two hours, with a scheduled break included.

Skywarn spotters are essential to the National Weather Service, law enforcement and fire officials, and
emergency managers. Among other things, spotters:

  • Provide valuable information on the severity of thunderstorms;
  • Allow downstream communities to understand the severity of thunderstorms moving toward them; and,
  • Allow the National Weather Service to gather information which helps verify the warnings it issues.

Those who volunteer to be Skywarn spotters offer a valuable service. At a minimum, it is asked that Sky-warn volunteers review procedures by attending a Skywarn spotter training session every two years.

Spotter training is open to members of the general pu blic, law enforcement, fire officials, and amateur
radio operators, among others. We look fo rward to your participation in Skywarn!

Treacherous Morning Commute in Lapeer County

The morning of March 4, 2011 turned out to bring freezing rain with a quick temperature drop and proved to be a challenging time for morning commuters.

We had up to 29 active calls for assistance on the dispatch screen at one time all relating to the bad weather conditions. These ranged from car crashes without injuries, crashes with injuries, vehicles off the road and expressway. More than 22 active calls on average remained on the screen throughout the morning.

The freezing rain began right around 7am and the resulting mess continued past 9am. All five of our dispatch positions were manned, including a sixth position in a small office just off the main dispatch room. In there, personnel manned a portable radio to monitor EMS traffic, taking the pressure off the other three radio positions.

The numerous amount of injuries resulted in a situation where ambulances from neighboring counties were called in to aid travelers who had been hurt. Lapeer County EMS had called in extra staff for all their stations and headed out with more ambulance rigs as well.

Several fire departments were dispatched to assist with crashes and wires down. Medical first responder teams were dispatched in many areas to aid EMS crews for injured people. All available police officers and Sheriff’s deputies were out helping clear up crashes and directing traffic at these scenes.

Kristen manning the telephones and LEIN radio
Mary manning the law dispatch radio and telephones
Mary, Susan and Kristen manning the radios and telephones
Marc manning the telephones
Tammy in the outer office manning a portable radio for EMS

A full dispatch screen of active calls
Kristen scanning the screen for EMS calls
Susan dispatching fire departments and medical first responders