Severe Weather Notification Options

 

Severe Weather Awareness Week – Tip #3

  1. Purchase a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio with S.A.M.E. (specific area message encoding) capabilities. This feature allows you to enter only those counties you want to get weather alerts for. Some local stores carry these radios. You can also order them online. They range in price from $35 – $50 depending on the additional features you want (i.e. AM/FM radio, etc.). You can also research them prior to your purchase by going on to YouTube. These devices work like an AM/FM radio…if you get it home and cannot find a channel were you hear a computerized weather person speaking, then you may need a different radio or an external antenna. Don’t hesitate to call the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242 prior to purchasing one and we will be glad to help you.lapeer radar.jpg
  2. Another great source for early warning notifications are smartphone applications. Here are just a few examples (in no particular order):http://www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/tornado-app
    http://www.abc12.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.wnem.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.minbcnews.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
  3. Tornado sirens. These are an “outdoor” warning device. If you cannot hear your community’s tornado siren on the first Saturday of each month (April – October) at 1:00pm, then please consider purchasing a weather radio.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please don’t hesitate to contact the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242.

Stay safe and stay dry!

Filling Sandbags, Stacking Sandbags & Building A Levee

Flood Wates Effect Areas Throughout ArkansasSevere Weather Awareness Week – Tip #2

Filling Sandbags, Stacking Sandbags & Building A Levee

Should you need to protect your home from flood waters, purchasing sandbags is the most cost effective method, but you can also purchase self-inflating sand bags – they look like a flat pillow and when they come in contact with water, they expand absorbing almost 40lbs of water. You build a levee with them just as you would with sandbags (without all the physical strains). It’s a bit more expensive, but an option for a person that may not be physically fit to fill sandbags.

Sandbag filling Procedures PDF

As you will read on page 3 – item #1, there are a lot of great video resources on YouTube relating to this as well.

[youtuber youtube=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rj7aUwIHYlw’]

If you have any questions, or need additional information on something, please don’t hesitate to contact the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242.

Stay dry!

It’s Here! Spring Has Finally Arrived!

1200669813O0PEfKSevere Weather Awareness Week – Tip #1

Along with the arrival of green grass and beautiful flowers, unfortunately also comes the chance for severe weather.

That is why the State of Michigan has declared April 7th through the 13th Michigan Severe Weather Awareness Week.

Attached are a few items from the American Red Cross that will help you get started on your planning.

Safe and Well Fact Sheet

Power outages

Pet Safety

2013 Lapeer County Tornado Siren Test Schedule

tornadoIf your community has a tornado siren, below are the dates that it will be tested:

  • Saturday, April 6th
  • Saturday, May 4th
  • Saturday, June 1st
  • Saturday, July 6th
  • Saturday, August 3rd
  • Saturday, September 7th
  • Saturday, October 5th

All tests will be held at 1:00PM

Should inclement weather be present at the time of testing, the test will be cancelled. If you have any questions, please contact your local fire department.

If your community does not have a siren, or you cannot hear a siren, you may want to purchase a NOAA All Hazard Weather Radio.

New Tornado App Brings American Red Cross Safety Information to Mobile Device

Audio alert feature can help save lives when users can’t monitor the weather

redcrossDETROIT, MI, March 5, 2013 — The American Red Cross has launched its official Tornado App, putting lifesaving information right in the hands of people who live in, visit or have loved ones in tornado-prone areas.

This free app—available in English or Spanish—gives iPhone, iPad and Android smart phone and tablet users instant access to local and real-time information, so t

hey know what to do before, during and after a tornado. The app includes a high-pitched siren and “tornado warning!” alert that signals people when a NOAA tornado warning has been issued in their area – even if the app is closed. An “all clear!” alert lets users know when a tornado warning has expired or has been cancelled.

“Tornadoes often happen in the overnight hours when people are sleeping,” said Glen Hendricks, Emergency Services Director, Southeastern Michigan Region. “The audible alerts in this app can save lives – even if users can’t monitor the weather because they are away from radio, TV or in places where weather band radios may not work.”

Other features of the app include:
• Location-based NOAA tornado, severe thunderstorm and flood watch and warning alerts;
• Enhanced weather maps;
• One-touch “I’m safe” messaging that allows users to broadcast reassurance to family and friends that they are out of harm’s way;
• Simple steps and checklists people can use to create an emergency plan and share it with household members;
• Preloaded content that gives users instant access to critical action steps, even without mobile connectivity;
• Toolkit with flashlight, strobe light and audible alarm;
• Locations of open Red Cross shelters; and
• Badges users can earn through interactive quizzes and share on social networks.

Launched during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week, the Tornado App is the latest in a series of mobile apps created by the Red Cross, the nation’s leader in emergency preparedness. The apps have been used to help save lives during hurricanes, earthquakes and wildfires.

“The Red Cross has made great strides in putting vital information in the hands of people who need it during emergencies. In fact, our apps are now on more than two million mobile devices across the country,” added Hendricks.

Mobile activity soared due to Superstorm Sandy:
• More than 400,000 people downloaded the Red Cross Hurricane App;
• Nearly 6 million NOAA weather alerts were sent;
• Preparedness content was the most popular feature of the app followed by alerts and the shelter locator;
• The average time spent using the app increased 300 percent; and
• The app had 15 million page views.

Right after the storm, the Hurricane App was updated with real-time recovery information including Red Cross shelter and feeding sites, FEMA sites, open gas stations and warming centers to help those affected by the storm.

The Tornado App, along with the others, can be found in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps. Apps can help prepare people for disasters, but they are not a substitute for training. Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED training empowers people to know how to respond to emergencies in case advanced medical help is delayed. People can visit redcross.org/takeaclass for course information and to register.

The Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters each year and we help people get ready to respond to emergencies by providing these apps for free. The Red Cross needs the help of the public to continue this lifesaving effort. People can make a donation to the Red Cross by going to redcross.org, texting REDCROSS to 90999 or by calling 1-800-REDCROSS

Available_on_the_App_Store

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at blog.redcross.org.

Tornado Spotter Training

2012 Tornado Spotter Training

April 19, 2012, 7 pm
Lapeer East High School
933 S Saginaw St, Lapeer, MI 48446
Pre-Registration open until April 9th.

This training is provided free of charge

Sign up at www.lapeerskywarn.org

Sponsored by:

Lapeer County Office of Emergency Management
Lapeer County Amateur Radio Association
Lapeer County CERT
National Weather Service – White Lake

If you have any questions, please Contact Mary Piorunek at the Emergency Management Office 810-667-0242.

Skywarn Training

Skywarn spotter training sessions are held to train individuals on how to accurately observe such weather
phenomena as floods, hail, wind and its associated da mage, cloud features that lead to tornadoes, and
those cloud features that do not lead to tornadoes.

In addition, topics covered during Skywarn training are:

  • The role of the spotter, the NWS and emergency services;
  • A recap of significant weather events during 2011;
  • The necessary atmospheric conditions for thunderstorm development;
  • Tornadoes;
  • Severe weather safety tips;
  • Severe weather terms used in National Weather Service products;
  • What to report to the National Weather Service; and,
  • How to report information to the National Weather Service.

Skywarn training presentations usually last around two hours, with a scheduled break included.

Skywarn spotters are essential to the National Weather Service, law enforcement and fire officials, and
emergency managers. Among other things, spotters:

  • Provide valuable information on the severity of thunderstorms;
  • Allow downstream communities to understand the severity of thunderstorms moving toward them; and,
  • Allow the National Weather Service to gather information which helps verify the warnings it issues.

Those who volunteer to be Skywarn spotters offer a valuable service. At a minimum, it is asked that Sky-warn volunteers review procedures by attending a Skywarn spotter training session every two years.

Spotter training is open to members of the general pu blic, law enforcement, fire officials, and amateur
radio operators, among others. We look fo rward to your participation in Skywarn!

Confirmed Tornado

On Thursday 03-15-2012 at 6:41PM, Lapeer County 911 received a call from an individual that observed
a rotating funnel cloud make ground contact near German Road in Columbiaville. Lapeer County 911
was notified by the National Weather Service that Lapeer County was under a tornado warning.

Tornado
Screenshot of the tornado taken from the iPhone app RadarScope.

Lapeer County Sheriffs Investigators discovered that two barns sustained considerable damage with
overturned farm implements immediately near German Road in Columbiaville. The residence was
approximately 500 feet behind a damaged barn. The home owners sought shelter within their basement.
Damage pattern is consistent with rotational force winds. Numerous individuals observed the tornado.
The home owners and numerous horses within a barn were not injured.

There was a void to the southeast for approximately 2 miles before another area of significant damage.
The damage consisted of numerous down-uprooted trees, down power lines, and damage to vehicles. The
damage pattern in this region is consistent with rotational force winds.

A two level residence was completely removed from the foundation (destroyed two car attached garage)
on Carpenter Road in Lapeer. The home owners were within the basement when the house was
separated from the foundation. When the residence and foundation separated, the home owners used
furniture for protection. Numerous individuals reported observing the tornado strike the residence. The
damage pattern to the residence is consistent with rotational force winds.

There was a three mile region that sustained storm damage. The tornado traveled in an east to southeast
direction. There are no reported injuries or deaths associated. Lapeer County Emergency Management
notified the National Weather Service who is expected to survey the damage on Friday 03-16-2012.

UPDATE: On Friday 03-16-2012:
The National Weather Service surveyed the storm damage on Friday 03-16-2012. It was
confirmed that the damage was created by an EF2 tornado (wind speeds between 111 MPH and
135 MPH). The tornado was on the ground for 9 minutes and traveled four to five miles.

Investigator: Jason G. Parks, Detective Sgt
jparks@lapeercounty.org

The EF2 Tornado in Oregon Township on March 15th of 2012 is the first confirmed tornado in Lapeer County during the month of March.   It is the third strongest tornado in our county.

1)         EF5 tornado   06-08-1953

2)         EF4 tornado   06-08-1953 (about an hour after the first)

Both these tornado were near Columbiaville and part of the Flint- Beecher Tornado.

Every other recorded tornado was either an EF0 or EF1 until yesterday.

Get RadarScope from the iTunes store here. [iPad version is also available]