Severe Weather Notification Options

 

Severe Weather Awareness Week – Tip #3

  1. Purchase a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio with S.A.M.E. (specific area message encoding) capabilities. This feature allows you to enter only those counties you want to get weather alerts for. Some local stores carry these radios. You can also order them online. They range in price from $35 – $50 depending on the additional features you want (i.e. AM/FM radio, etc.). You can also research them prior to your purchase by going on to YouTube. These devices work like an AM/FM radio…if you get it home and cannot find a channel were you hear a computerized weather person speaking, then you may need a different radio or an external antenna. Don’t hesitate to call the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242 prior to purchasing one and we will be glad to help you.lapeer radar.jpg
  2. Another great source for early warning notifications are smartphone applications. Here are just a few examples (in no particular order):http://www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/tornado-app
    http://www.abc12.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.wnem.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
    http://www.minbcnews.com/weather (browse the page until you find an option that says “download weather alert app to your phone”.)
  3. Tornado sirens. These are an “outdoor” warning device. If you cannot hear your community’s tornado siren on the first Saturday of each month (April – October) at 1:00pm, then please consider purchasing a weather radio.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please don’t hesitate to contact the Lapeer County Emergency Management Office at 810-667-0242.

Stay safe and stay dry!

It’s Here! Spring Has Finally Arrived!

1200669813O0PEfKSevere Weather Awareness Week – Tip #1

Along with the arrival of green grass and beautiful flowers, unfortunately also comes the chance for severe weather.

That is why the State of Michigan has declared April 7th through the 13th Michigan Severe Weather Awareness Week.

Attached are a few items from the American Red Cross that will help you get started on your planning.

Safe and Well Fact Sheet

Power outages

Pet Safety

2013 Lapeer County Tornado Siren Test Schedule

tornadoIf your community has a tornado siren, below are the dates that it will be tested:

  • Saturday, April 6th
  • Saturday, May 4th
  • Saturday, June 1st
  • Saturday, July 6th
  • Saturday, August 3rd
  • Saturday, September 7th
  • Saturday, October 5th

All tests will be held at 1:00PM

Should inclement weather be present at the time of testing, the test will be cancelled. If you have any questions, please contact your local fire department.

If your community does not have a siren, or you cannot hear a siren, you may want to purchase a NOAA All Hazard Weather Radio.

New Tornado App Brings American Red Cross Safety Information to Mobile Device

Audio alert feature can help save lives when users can’t monitor the weather

redcrossDETROIT, MI, March 5, 2013 — The American Red Cross has launched its official Tornado App, putting lifesaving information right in the hands of people who live in, visit or have loved ones in tornado-prone areas.

This free app—available in English or Spanish—gives iPhone, iPad and Android smart phone and tablet users instant access to local and real-time information, so t

hey know what to do before, during and after a tornado. The app includes a high-pitched siren and “tornado warning!” alert that signals people when a NOAA tornado warning has been issued in their area – even if the app is closed. An “all clear!” alert lets users know when a tornado warning has expired or has been cancelled.

“Tornadoes often happen in the overnight hours when people are sleeping,” said Glen Hendricks, Emergency Services Director, Southeastern Michigan Region. “The audible alerts in this app can save lives – even if users can’t monitor the weather because they are away from radio, TV or in places where weather band radios may not work.”

Other features of the app include:
• Location-based NOAA tornado, severe thunderstorm and flood watch and warning alerts;
• Enhanced weather maps;
• One-touch “I’m safe” messaging that allows users to broadcast reassurance to family and friends that they are out of harm’s way;
• Simple steps and checklists people can use to create an emergency plan and share it with household members;
• Preloaded content that gives users instant access to critical action steps, even without mobile connectivity;
• Toolkit with flashlight, strobe light and audible alarm;
• Locations of open Red Cross shelters; and
• Badges users can earn through interactive quizzes and share on social networks.

Launched during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week, the Tornado App is the latest in a series of mobile apps created by the Red Cross, the nation’s leader in emergency preparedness. The apps have been used to help save lives during hurricanes, earthquakes and wildfires.

“The Red Cross has made great strides in putting vital information in the hands of people who need it during emergencies. In fact, our apps are now on more than two million mobile devices across the country,” added Hendricks.

Mobile activity soared due to Superstorm Sandy:
• More than 400,000 people downloaded the Red Cross Hurricane App;
• Nearly 6 million NOAA weather alerts were sent;
• Preparedness content was the most popular feature of the app followed by alerts and the shelter locator;
• The average time spent using the app increased 300 percent; and
• The app had 15 million page views.

Right after the storm, the Hurricane App was updated with real-time recovery information including Red Cross shelter and feeding sites, FEMA sites, open gas stations and warming centers to help those affected by the storm.

The Tornado App, along with the others, can be found in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps. Apps can help prepare people for disasters, but they are not a substitute for training. Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED training empowers people to know how to respond to emergencies in case advanced medical help is delayed. People can visit redcross.org/takeaclass for course information and to register.

The Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters each year and we help people get ready to respond to emergencies by providing these apps for free. The Red Cross needs the help of the public to continue this lifesaving effort. People can make a donation to the Red Cross by going to redcross.org, texting REDCROSS to 90999 or by calling 1-800-REDCROSS

Available_on_the_App_Store

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at blog.redcross.org.

Flooded & Icy Roads

flooding-lkwd-300x229Many roads in Lapeer County today are flooded and/or icy. Please take extra caution when traveling today. Do not attempt to drive through a flooded roadway.

Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard. The main reason is people underestimate the force and power of water. More than half of all flood related deaths result from vehicles being swept downstream. Of these, many are preventable.

Q: What can I do to avoid getting caught is this situation?

Follow these safety rules:

  • Monitor the NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, or your favorite news source for vital weather related information.
  • If flooding occurs, get to higher ground. Get out of areas subject to flooding. This includes dips, low spots, canyons, washes etc.
  • Avoid areas already flooded, especially if the water is flowing fast. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Road beds may be washed out under flood waters. NEVER drive through flooded roadways. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
  • Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.

Find out more about Turn Around, Don’t Drown