Flooded & Icy Roads

flooding-lkwd-300x229Many roads in Lapeer County today are flooded and/or icy. Please take extra caution when traveling today. Do not attempt to drive through a flooded roadway.

Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard. The main reason is people underestimate the force and power of water. More than half of all flood related deaths result from vehicles being swept downstream. Of these, many are preventable.

Q: What can I do to avoid getting caught is this situation?

Follow these safety rules:

  • Monitor the NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, or your favorite news source for vital weather related information.
  • If flooding occurs, get to higher ground. Get out of areas subject to flooding. This includes dips, low spots, canyons, washes etc.
  • Avoid areas already flooded, especially if the water is flowing fast. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Road beds may be washed out under flood waters. NEVER drive through flooded roadways. Turn Around Don’t Drown
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
  • Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.

Find out more about Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Tornado Spotter Training

2012 Tornado Spotter Training

April 19, 2012, 7 pm
Lapeer East High School
933 S Saginaw St, Lapeer, MI 48446
Pre-Registration open until April 9th.

This training is provided free of charge

Sign up at www.lapeerskywarn.org

Sponsored by:

Lapeer County Office of Emergency Management
Lapeer County Amateur Radio Association
Lapeer County CERT
National Weather Service – White Lake

If you have any questions, please Contact Mary Piorunek at the Emergency Management Office 810-667-0242.

Skywarn Training

Skywarn spotter training sessions are held to train individuals on how to accurately observe such weather
phenomena as floods, hail, wind and its associated da mage, cloud features that lead to tornadoes, and
those cloud features that do not lead to tornadoes.

In addition, topics covered during Skywarn training are:

  • The role of the spotter, the NWS and emergency services;
  • A recap of significant weather events during 2011;
  • The necessary atmospheric conditions for thunderstorm development;
  • Tornadoes;
  • Severe weather safety tips;
  • Severe weather terms used in National Weather Service products;
  • What to report to the National Weather Service; and,
  • How to report information to the National Weather Service.

Skywarn training presentations usually last around two hours, with a scheduled break included.

Skywarn spotters are essential to the National Weather Service, law enforcement and fire officials, and
emergency managers. Among other things, spotters:

  • Provide valuable information on the severity of thunderstorms;
  • Allow downstream communities to understand the severity of thunderstorms moving toward them; and,
  • Allow the National Weather Service to gather information which helps verify the warnings it issues.

Those who volunteer to be Skywarn spotters offer a valuable service. At a minimum, it is asked that Sky-warn volunteers review procedures by attending a Skywarn spotter training session every two years.

Spotter training is open to members of the general pu blic, law enforcement, fire officials, and amateur
radio operators, among others. We look fo rward to your participation in Skywarn!